lessons

Case study: New technology, traditional approach

Rural services OnlineRural Services Online, www.rsnonline.org.uk, the new website for the "Rural Services Network" was launched last week. Although it is implemented in Joomla (open source, web 2.0 etc) it takes a very traditional approach. Non-members can only see the news from the last 7 days. After that, all but the headline and opening sentence disappear behind an ID and Password.

There's also an 'Analysis & Comment' section, a Forum and Document Store for members only. Anyone can read the events calendar.

The journalism is very good and is by Johann Tasker of Ruralcity Media but will this site help organisations part with the £400+ membership fee? What do you think?

 

It's the people who matter

Steve Dale - who blogs at Dissident - is highly experienced in the field of social media and online communities. He's clearly feeling some frustration with people who think that just installing the right tool or improving their site will help communication flow. In It's not the (social networking) technology - it's the people that matter he writes:  read more »

Start small, work with enthusiasts

Chris Brogan, writing from the US, offers advice on how a nonprofit organisation might begin using social media:

A friend from the UK writes to ask me how she might help her somewhat traditional trade association see the value of using a social networking application to facilitate communications between association members, and maybe also as a way to encourage new members to participate. Trade associations are a perfect type of organization to employ social networking tools to encourage conversations and build digital relationships. Here are some potential next steps.  read more »

"The committee won't go for it" ... and other stories

Circuit  Rider workshopLast week's Circuit Riders conference in Birmingham was a great opportunity to catch up on the front-line realities of working with organisations, as well as co-presenting a workshop with Laura Whitehead and Nick Booth. Paul Henderson helped out and has blogged the session here.  read more »

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